An ex-pat who was left homeless by a blood clot in a catheter is angry the NHS refused to provide treatment and help after she was left without oxygen, breathing aid or even a ventilator.

The 30-year-old has lived in temporary accommodation for more than a year in London’s South Kensington neighbourhood, after being told her home in the East End of the capital was unsafe due to high crime.

“I am so angry, I was just told I couldn’t come to the hospital because the doctors would not treat me,” she told The Independent.

The former patient said she was taken to the Royal Victoria Hospital in north London on May 25 after becoming unwell in her bedroom. “

There is no need for me to be homeless, but I am homeless because of what I did.”

The former patient said she was taken to the Royal Victoria Hospital in north London on May 25 after becoming unwell in her bedroom.

It was after she had had her blood tested and found her clots were low that she was told she could not go to the surgery.

She said she felt “scared” and “shocked” by the decision.

“It was a total shock,” she said.

“The staff just said I couldn, that it would be difficult for me.

They said it was too dangerous for me.”

The woman was left with no access to a vent, breathing tube or a pillow, and was unable to use her own bed or even sleep in the hospital’s communal hall.

She also had to share a toilet with her fellow patients.

A spokesman for the Royal London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (RHLHT), which runs the hospital, said it had been aware of the incident.

The spokeswoman added that the hospital was “working with her to address the issues.” “

We are aware of her experience and have been working with her team to address these issues.”

The spokeswoman added that the hospital was “working with her to address the issues.”

Ms Stirling, who has since moved to the city’s Southwark neighbourhood, said she now had to wait at a friend’s house for a new bed, which means she cannot stay in her home and does not have a place to sleep.

“If I could go back I would have gone to bed and not had to suffer,” she added.

She has been unable to sleep since her accommodation was taken away.

“My husband is an emergency worker and he is really sick,” she continued.

“He doesn’t have access to the toilet, the oxygen, the bed and I can’t use my own bed.”

The RHLHT said it has offered to pay for the woman’s housing.

“Due to the number of patients in our care, we do not have sufficient space for every patient,” it said in a statement.

“Our emergency department is an important part of our care and we take all patients’ safety and wellbeing seriously.”

The statement added: “As part of the arrangements we have made, the hospital will provide the individual with temporary accommodation, but will not be responsible for her or her family’s care.”

Our priority is to provide safe and appropriate care for patients.

We are committed to ensuring that every patient is treated as if they are a patient and as a member of our team, and we are always working to improve our care in the South Kensham area.